1989 Mazda B2300 Review from North America

1989 Mazda B2300 Extended Cab

Year of manufacture1989
First year of ownership1989
Most recent year of ownership2003
Engine and transmission Automatic
Performance marks 8 / 10
Reliability marks 8 / 10
Comfort marks 8 / 10
Dealer Service marks 8 / 10
Running Costs (higher is cheaper) 8 / 10
Overall marks (average of all marks)
8.0 / 10
Distance when acquired0 miles
Most recent distance285000 miles
Previous carMazda B2200

Summary:

Wonderful

Faults:

Fuel pump.

General Comments:

I bought a Mazda B2200 in 1987. It was a regular cab. I bragged on it so much to my father that he bought one in 1989. He bought an extended cab. I drove my truck until 1999 when the freeze plugs came out and blew the engine. This was an excuse for my father to sell me his extended cab and buy him a newer truck. I gladly took his off his hands and have thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it. Currently it has 285,000 miles on it. (By the way, he bought a newer Nissan and hates it. Too bad for him!) I use my old regular cab for spare parts.

Over the past 2 years, I've had fuel related problems. About a year ago, I replaced the fuel pump (automatic transmission with pump in the tank). The last time I drove it, the engine stalled and I could not get it to crank. The engine turns over fine, but it just will not fire. It acts as though it isn't getting fuel to the carburetor. I have a dealer's repair manual that advises me to check the "fuel pump control unit". However, I can't find where this is located. The manual suggests using a jumper wire to see if the pump is operating. If it doesn't operate, it suggests replacing the pump.

Can anyone advise me where I can find the "fuel pump control unit"? Also, just in case I have to replace the fuel pump, can anyone suggest a good brand of fuel pump manufacturer?

Please feel free to e-mail me direct at cbcaldwell@hotmail.com.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 25th March, 2003

6th Jan 2004, 19:20

I would pour a little gas into the carbarator and try starting. If the engine starts, it's probably the electric pump or the relay which controls it.

Average review marks: 8.0 / 10, based on 1 review