1976 Cadillac DeVille Sedan Deville 500cid from North America

Summary:

The big Deville beast!

Faults:

Had not one thing wrong with the car for the 5 years that my wife and I had it.

General Comments:

First and foremost, we have been diehard Deville fans for many years. In fact, we still have ownership to 2 of them. One is a 1999 Deville Roadster, and the other is a 2002 Deville DHS. Our triple navy blue 1976 Sedan Deville was one of the best ones. It ran perfectly! To this day, my wife and I still talk about that car! Right now, we are in the midst of finding a triple navy blue 1976 Sedan Deville exactly like the one we had back in 1976. In fact, we are hoping to find one with not so high miles, but in excellent condition so that we could trace back the times that we had with it. Until then, we'll enjoy our newer Deville's.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 17th July, 2006

7th May 2008, 03:24

Your '76 sounds like a gorgeous car! I just got a 1975 Sedan Deville from Laguna Hills CA, and imported it to New Zealand. It certainly turns a few heads over here! http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3020129/1975-cadillac-deville

1976 Cadillac DeVille Coupe 8.c litre (502 ci) from North America

Summary:

5000 pounds of red metallic flash and fun

Faults:

Since purchasing the car I have had to replace the following parts to make it roadworthy:

Power steering pressure hose.

Alternator.

Battery.

Muffler and resonator.

Lots of soap, polish and scrub brushes.

General Comments:

My wife bought this car for me as a retirement present for 20 years in the US Navy, to drive cross country this fall, and to display this summer in the local shows. There will be plenty of Camaros and Mustangs, but very few Cads!

This car was extremely dirty when I bought it after years of storage, but has cleaned up incredibly well. The red metallic paint and white leather interior look almost brand new, and the car looks to be in fantastic shape for any car, let alone one 29 years old.

For the barca-cruiser it is, handling is quite good. If you know how the behemoths of the 70's handle, and have the nerve to drive them hard, they can handle surprising well. It's a lot of fun to see the looks of your passengers as you drive a 5000+ pound brick like a sports car. A lot of people think these cars are cement blocks, but the suspension is quite sporty while being soft and comfortable. It can be driven like it's on rails if you hold on tight and pucker up enough.

The 502 big block needs a little help. In a matter of 5 years of production, this engine's output was almost halved by choking it with emission controls. An engine this big should be able to twist the tires off the rims. Once I get it cleaned up and going well, I am going to address this problem with either modern high performance parts, or donor parts from an earlier engine.

This is truly the last of the real road crushers. In 77 all manufacturers started to shrink their cars or replace their big-car model lines. It is the final hurrah for a time we will not see again.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 1st June, 2005

10th Aug 2007, 08:48

The orginal poster was right about 70's cars.

They were great drivers if you had a guts to run them to their potential. A 16 yr old could not climb in one and make it drive to its potential...

70's cars were awesome, no matter what anyone says.

2nd May 2008, 19:36

I test drove a '76 Coupe De Ville today with only 50,000 miles just for fun. I love the '70's land boats, but never had the pleasure of driving one (I'm 23). I drive a Buick Park Avenue and the Cadillac was very overwhelming to maneuver in comparison! Visibility was not the greatest and the sheer dimensions of the car coupled with no steering feel made it a real chore to drive in tight situations. I didn't feel comfortable taking my eyes off the road for a second! The turning radius seemed to be somewhere close to the length of my Buick. I wouldn't want to have to park this car let alone find a place big enough to park it.

While driving a car this big would take some getting used to, I would love to have the opportunity to buy a new car like this. I agree with the commenter and think it is sad that American cars have shrunk so much over the last 32 years. I won't even mention the invisible styling of most modern cars. Sigh. Oh well, I guess all good things must come to an end, and cars like these just don't fit into a world with $4 gasoline. I really hate to think what the automotive world will have to offer in another 10 years.

1976 Cadillac DeVille 8.2L V8 from North America

Summary:

A classic mid-seventies land yacht

Faults:

I have had to replace numerous electrical items and switches.

I have rebuilt the carburetor.

It is developing a small oil leak.

General Comments:

This car is a classic mid-seventies Coupe De Ville pimp-mobile that rides wonderfully smooth.

While nostalgic and very large at almost 3 tons, it is a pleasure to drive anywhere.

It is certainly not economical to operate with its 501 cubic inch engine.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 7th September, 2002

21st Feb 2011, 17:51

Actually the engine is 500 cubic inches! 501 is a part number for the fan shroud radiator support. It's a common misconception Not that one cubic inch matters, it's still the largest displacement production V8 ever made.

3rd May 2011, 19:49

I just bought a 1976 Coupe De Ville. It has 51,266 original miles.

I must say that I am totally impressed with this car. The ride is unbelievable. I know a lot of people don't like that floaty ride, but the comfort level on this car is so high.

It is still quiet, and the 500cu. in. monster impresses with its smoothness.

I don't believe these cars were under engineered as some people say. This is American steel at its best.