1995 Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo 3.0 V6 twin turbo from North America

Summary:

Future classic

Faults:

I have owned this car for 8 years, and absolutely nothing has gone seriously wrong with it, with the exception of the turbos needing replacement.

Turbos needed replacing. Replacement cost about $3000 (parts and labour included).

General Comments:

This car is so good in so many ways it's ridiculous. It has razor-sharp steering, with good weight and lots of feedback. The manual transmission shifts smoothly, and with nice feel and little play. The car surges with power on the highway. It's comfortable on long cruises up the twisty British Columbia Coast mountain highways. And, of course, it is beautiful, even to this day.

I keep this car even though I have an Acura and BMW for daily drivers, only because I can't bear to sell it. It has been so reliable and so fun to drive, I still love it.

And, most importantly, it is the only car I've owned that makes me glance back to admire it every time I have to park it and walk away.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 25th March, 2010

1995 Nissan 300ZX NA 3.0L V6 from North America

Summary:

Timeless styling and reliability in a sports car!

Faults:

The stock Bose radio used to cutoff randomly. Upon some research I discovered it was a wiring fault within the radio, so I picked up a better aftermarket unit and problem solved (note I had to think on finding something that actually went wrong with the car)

General Comments:

The car has classic looks. It still looks better than many cars on the road today and considering the design came out as a 1990 model, it truly can be classified as timeless.

Performance is excellent and the car came standard with all the luxury items you could hope for in the 90's.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 1st October, 2003

1995 Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo 3.0 24 Valve - turbo from North America

Summary:

Reliable Speed

Faults:

The rear wheel steering actuation motor burned out after 3 years and 90,000km. Repair was covered by warranty.

The car went through a new set of front brake pads every 20-25,000km roughly.

Starter motor died during the 6th year (around 170,000km) and cost me about US $750 to replace (including labor).

Mufflers (2 of them) had to be replaced twice, at 70,000km and at 160,000km.

AC compressor died at 140,000 and cost US $1,400 to replace.

All 4 wheel bearings were replaced at 160,000km costing a total of US $1,100 including labor.

ABS controller died at 155,000km. It cost US $980 to replace (including labor)

In addition to the above, the interior lamp/horn fuse used to blow chronically every time I touched the horn. That was address by replacing the horn switch contacts in the steering wheel (covered under warranty)

General Comments:

This was one great car to own and drive, especially when taking it's performance into consideration. Hardly any cars could keep up with it in terms of power, handling, reliability and style.

However it was costly to own. Insurance was expensive, it burned premium unleaded as if I owned an oil field, and parts were relatively expensive.

Overall I would say it was a very rewarding car to own. I could hardly fault it for anything.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 22nd May, 2003

17th Aug 2004, 19:07

If you're from north america, like your car's listed right now, then why do you list everything in KM, why not miles, or both?

30th Oct 2004, 17:10

Maybe he's from Canada or Mexico, countries where they use the metric system?

10th Jul 2005, 08:18

Yes I am from Canada indeed.

10th Jul 2005, 14:09

I agree with the post above, and also apologize for that naive comment. I am from the US and as big a patriot as they come. But, I am also a scientist, and thouroughly familiar with the metric system and its utility, as is everyone else here who works with units and technical calulations. Do not listen to that airhead a few comments ago. Nice review.

16th Aug 2005, 04:16

Regarding the issue of brake pads, a friend of mine used to replace his brake pads in a naturally aspirated 1993 300ZX about once every 15,000km. The 300ZX, regardless of its power, is a relatively heavy car, so it eats at brake pads quicker than lighter sports cars. But you are right though, the main factor in brake pad longevity is driving style. According to the dealer, I was one of the better drivers in that sense - since I needed new pads less often than other drivers.

These days, I live in the middle east and I got myself a small sports hatch (Renault Sport Clio 172). It is not nearly as fast as the 300ZX was, but I find it far more involving to drive vs. the Z.

The Z had so much technology that lots of driver involvement was replaced by computer decisions. This technological overkill is what ultimately drove the cost of the Z through the roof and led to its demise. But I hear that Nissan got it right in the new 350Z. I guess I will call a Nissan dealer for a test drive - although for now, I am quite happy with my Clio. It burns about half as much fuel as my old 300Z and in some funny sort of way, it actually excites me more to drive.

29th Aug 2005, 22:01

Do you still have the 300zx turbo I'm planning to get one, but not sure what year its best for me to get??? if you could tell me a good year for it.

11th Mar 2006, 17:30

One guy asks a question and some SENSITIVE types jump down his throat. Chill.

18th Apr 2008, 17:44

I am close to buying a silver 95 Nissan 300ZX non-turbo, it has 150 k miles. Is this a good idea?