1986 Jaguar XJ40 Daimler 3.6 litre

Summary:

The XJ40 is brilliant by design, with grace, space and pace in the true Jaguar tradition

Faults:

Rear passenger roof line grab handles have broken retaining roll pins, so they fall off.

Center console digital clock must be reset each time the ignition is turned on. I re-flowed the solder joints on the PC board, which may have fixed it.

Radio would not work in FM mode. The car came from Japan, and the FM band is 76 to 90 MHz; in Australia it is 88 to 108 MHz.

Heater valve not operating; no vacuum detected at the actuator.

Auto ride leveling has been disconnected and fitted with standard suspension.

Anti lock warning stays on. Need to check and clean the wheel sensors.

Slight rust in the rear right door and the rear right fender near the tail light.

Power windows and door locks are slow to operate.

Drive train wear seems to have caused a lot of take up when shifting from drive to reverse and back.

Metric tyre sizes 390 215 60 v 98; not made anywhere.

Some plastic trims missing on the inside door handles.

Roof head liner has been replaced.

General Comments:

This car is 24 years old, and has traveled only 65000kms.

The interior is perfect like new.

The car drives like a dream, but Japanese emission standards mean it has slow response to the throttle.

The car was stored in a shipping container for 5 years.

I paid $7,500 dollars, and will need to spend around $3000 to restore it to Purrrfect condition.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 29th June, 2010

1988 Jaguar XJ40 3.6

Summary:

Great car, a lot of car for a little money

Faults:

Warning light for ABS has illuminated, however this is a common fault, still need to check, but may be a gummed up sensor or connections. This has not affected general braking during dry conditions.

General Comments:

As far as handling is concerned, the Jag is miles ahead of anything I have ever owned, and believe me, I have had quite a few cars.

The car takes corners like you would not believe, loves long bends and grips the road beautifully.

The J shift gearbox shift extremely quietly through the gears, it is hard to even notice a gear change.

Pick up from 0-80 is not super quick when auto mode is chosen, however switch to manual and it has plenty of power (still adequate in auto though).

The interior is luxurious compared to standard Australian production cars. The driver's seat is super comfortable, and can be moved any which way. The rear seats are also extremely comfortable.

The cars features make it hard to believe it is 21 years old, it drives and handles better than some newer cars I have had. My car does have Full Service History and was owned by a Jag lover.

As far as value for money is concerned, you cannot beat it. I paid $2000 for the car, I still cannot believe how good it goes for an older car.

For new buyers, make sure you check for rust as Jags are prone for it. My car however only has a couple of small bubbles appearing.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 28th November, 2009

1988 Jaguar XJ40 Sovereign 3.6L

Summary:

This is a car I will keep 'til I die, it's brilliant!

Faults:

One rear strut "top-hat" worn badly.

Instrument lights constantly change intensity.

ABS warning symbol turns on (sometimes!).

Moisture in the boot.

General Comments:

I have replaced the "top-hat", and the improvement in ride and road noise is outstanding. Around the 'burbs it is a dream to drive, but get it out on the open highway, and it chews up the K's with the greatest comfort.

I did have an overheating problem getting over the Range, but have attributed that to an after-market radiator cap??? Or could it be a thermostat problem?

I seem to have had a win on the instrument lights by cleaning up the Earth stud on the firewall, but since then have introduced a fault with the brake pad wear monitor, and it's become hard to start when cold. (Neither were apparent before disconnecting the battery.) (Haven't seen the ABS warning since then though...)

After tracing the brake wear pad wiring, the front L cable wasn't connected to the loom, but the R one was. Can they be left disconnected or do they need to be shorted to disable the monitoring?

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 11th July, 2007