2002 Chevrolet Camaro Z-28 from North America - Comments

16th Sep 2005, 11:44

I only wonder if this guy blew up the LS1 yet as he was drag racing it during the break-in period. I would put at least 5,000 miles on an engine before driving it that hard. Good luck!!

27th Nov 2005, 13:49

Hahahahaha! you guys are funny! that just made my day! :)

31st Aug 2006, 18:23

I am so sick of reading of these great, positive, remarkable reviews about nice 8-cylinder sports cars and how they're all that. Why? because I'm so damn jealous of those people with those nice high performance cars. I've wanted one since literally, freakin' 2001 when I made the huge mistake of spending ALL my money on a car I never even wanted, a damn 6-cylinder sports car. and to anyone who replies to this review of mine, don't mention me test driving next time. I've heard that time and time again. I admit, I made the mistake of rushing myself, I didn't think it through enough. my point is, is that as I am so jealous of those people with those great 8-cylinder cars like Camaro Z28s and Corvettes, and 8-cylinder Firebirds, and 8-cylinder Mustangs, I WILL get that 8-cylinder at some point, you can bet on that.

And as for the cheerleader driving the mustang, was she hot? I love how hot those girls look in those sexy cheerleader outfits!

1st Sep 2006, 04:50

Don't knock 6 cylinders. Take a look at your local Dyno board list where hp means more than cubic inches. I have seen a V6 place higher than a modified V10 Viper RT/10 in Jacksonville Fla. The Viper belongs to my son.

21st Mar 2008, 09:13

You six cylinder guys I feel sorry for. I went that route and listened to you guys. I went from a 74 Z28 to an S2000 and you know what? I hated it. Just have to have that loud rumble and not that annoying weed-eater noise. Luckily for me there are people out there that really like those cars for some reason and I was able to trade for a 2002 Z28. Long live the Camaro!!!

10th May 2009, 22:25

As a mechanic and former drag racer (early to mid 70's) I like to try and head off such misconceptions as "break-in periods". Modern cars actually need to be broken in the way they are going to be driven... from DAY ONE. Some of my owners manuals have even instructed owners to accelerate full-throttle often during the first miles. I've always broken in my cars with tire-smoking, red-lining take-offs right after leaving the dealer's lot with them. Never a problem... NOT ONE. My cars have all been domestics except for 3 imports (which fell apart before 100,000 miles).

It's also amusing that so few people seem aware of how much abuse their "brand new" cars get before they buy them. I worked for Ford in the 70's, and I can assure you, your car has seen MANY red-linings and tire-smoking burn-outs before you ever got it. Mechanics, salesmen and dealership employees LOVE to hot-dog the cars. I fondly remember taking off one day in a brand new V-8 Maverick (an incredibly fast car for its day) and thinking I had blown the transmission because the engine was revving madly and I wasn't getting anywhere. Then I noticed the huge clouds of tire smoke in the rear view mirror. I smoked the tires for half a block... then sold the car to a sweet little old 70-year-old lady.

You also have to remember that most new cars have been test-driven several times before being sold. Yes, some shy, timid souls never get over 40 or accelerate more rapidly than an anemic tortoise during a test drive, but most actually want some idea of the car's capability. Every car I test drive is accelerated flat-out many times, pitched into corners in 4-wheel drifts, and put through several panic stops to check braking and brake fade. If EVERYONE would do this, you would see much less of people whining because after they bought it it didn't live up to their expectations. If they REALLY test drove it, they'd KNOW how it performed. This isn't 1940. Modern cars (especially domestics) don't require ANY pampering.

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