24th Jul 2012, 17:35

I would love to buy a new traditional full-size American car. The Impala misses the mark completely in my opinion though. The styling is very bland and it really isn't very big (in the 70's it would have been considered compact). I am sure the ride is not on par with big cars of the past either. I say this because I had a 2011 Buick Lucerne, and I wasn't overly impressed with the suppleness of the ride, and I can only imagine the Impala is not as comfortable as that car.

I wish I could buy my 2005 Buick Park Avenue brand new again. Now that was a traditional car. I know it wasn't rear wheel drive or body on frame, and didn't have a V-8, but the styling and comfort were better than any other modern big car in my opinion. And in Northern Indiana, front wheel drive is great in the winter, and try getting over 30 MPG with a V-8. It was definitely designed with a nod to the past; there really is nothing left like that on the market anymore. Now everything looks alike, and is way too small and not extremely comfortable, like cars of the past were.

I currently have a large crossover, and probably won't own another car, as long as they remain as they currently are.

30th Jul 2012, 12:03

The Impala is a full size car, not mid size. A midsize would be something like a Fusion or a Malibu. This car is clearly larger than both of those cars.

31st Jul 2012, 19:49

I've driven both the Crown Vic and Chevy Impala. Both are exceptionally rugged and reliable cars. And, by the way, both are full-sized cars.

My preference would be the no-longer-made Crown Vic, simply because it is rear drive, and no front drive car can really compete in any way with a rear drive.

We currently own a rear drive SUV and sports car, and a front-drive mid-sized sedan. The best on snow or ice is by far the rear drive SUV. The sports car is the worst, but the front-drive sedan is not much better. I have found the benefits of front drive totally over rated. In fact, I have found NO benefits to front drive cars at all. They are much more expensive and difficult to repair, are more fragile, and offer no real advantages in handling.