1971 Lincoln Continental Review

1971 Lincoln Continental Mark 3 460 V8 from North America

Year of manufacture1971
First year of ownership2002
Most recent year of ownership2004
Engine and transmission 460 V8 Automatic
Performance marks 10 / 10
Comfort marks 10 / 10
Running Costs (higher is cheaper) 1 / 10
Overall marks (average of all marks)
7.0 / 10
Previous carFord F100

Summary:

One cool car

Faults:

Nothing, really. The things that are wrong with it were there when I purchased the car. It has been seriously neglected and has lots of rust, but is complete. It needs to be completely restored.

General Comments:

This Car is absolutely gorgeous. Its low slung, and was designed to cruise. You have to be one cool cat before you dare enter this car. It is black, with red leather interior, and has all the options. I even have the owners manual. I checked the owners manual against the car, and this baby has it all: Power everything, 8 track, auto headlight dimmer, (which still works) cruise control, automatic climate control, A/C, Sure-Track Brake system. This system is supposed to pump the rear brakes so they won't lock up. Not sure how it works, or if it is safe. does anyone know?

This car has 460 Cubic Inches of Detroit Muscle! The carb is huge, and loves the gas! it make 365 horses, although I am not sure whether that is in the crank or wheels.

I have a 65 International Short Bus (Motor home) and the Lincoln is almost as long!

I think that unless I play chicken with a train, I would survive a wreck. This car would hammer almost any new car into the ground.

Like my mom says, its like driving an armchair down the road. This is my favorite vehicle, and I will never part with it. I wonder if I could use this car as my casket when I die...

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 26th March, 2004

14th Jun 2004, 20:43

The 365 HP rating is a "gross rating" - the HP is measured by the manufacturer at the crankshaft, with no air filter, and no accessories (A/C compressor, power steering pump, etc). This test is done low-humidity, 67-degree Fahrenheit air. The engine is at each RPM level to obtain optimum power. Manufacturers used this rating system to achieve high "advertised horsepower" numbers before the '70's gas crunch. In 1971 & 1972 (depending on the manufacturer), the "net rating" system was adopted - HP is measured with the air filter & all accessories & emissions equipment in place, in 72-degree air at higher humidity, to get a more realistic number. Net HP usually works out to around 75% of gross HP, so the way HP is measured today, your Lincoln would rate around 275 HP (which is still damn powerful). Rear-wheel HP is much more variable, and not as easily estimated.

Average review marks: 7.0 / 10, based on 1 review