1998 Subaru Forester Reviews - Page 2 of 6

1998 Subaru Forester L from North America

Model year1998
Year of manufacture1998
First year of ownership2008
Most recent year of ownership2008
Engine and transmission Automatic
Distance when acquired168000 miles
Most recent distance188000 miles

Summary:

Fairly disappointed

Faults:

I bought the car used in March of this year. Have been hearing a grinding sound, sort of a rubbing when making sharp turns. Came to find out, my axle boot is deteriorated and needs to be replaced, but cannot be done without replacing axle as well, so that will need to be scheduled.

Just had 3 belts replaced, 4 tires put on, total tune up all this at around 900.00.

Now am told that oil is leaking into coolant from some gasket somewhere,; Sears didn't have the technology to tell me from where, so have called Subaru and am waiting for a call back.

Everyone else on this site says it's from a blown head gasket, but the inside indicator does not go up to hot, so I don't know if that is it. She does smell hot however when I park her, and I have just gotten out of the car; is this a head gasket or an intake gasket leak? Does anyone know?

Thanks.

General Comments:

Oil leaking into coolant.

Uncomfortable long distance driving.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Don't Know

Review Date: 26th November, 2008

26th Nov 2008, 16:59

CV shafts are a common failure on any car with high miles like yours. Belts, tires, tuneup are all common wear items on vehicles. Coolant in oil = bad. From what you say, it is probably a head gasket. A intake gasket leak would typically cause the exhaust to run white. If you smell/see coolant on the engine, it is likley the head gasket. That is probably why the previous owner sold it to you.

26th Nov 2008, 17:51

Many cars have been scrapped long before they reach 180,000 miles.

1998 Subaru Forester LX 4 cylinder from North America

Model year1998
Year of manufacture1997
First year of ownership1998
Most recent year of ownership2008
Engine and transmission 4 cylinder Automatic
Performance marks 0 / 10
Reliability marks 0 / 10
Overall marks (average of all marks)
0.0 / 10
Distance when acquired7 miles
Most recent distance55 miles
Previous carHonda Accord

Summary:

Defective model

Faults:

3 wheel bearing replacements.

General Comments:

I am original owner of '98 Forester. At 14K miles, I had right rear wheel bearing replaced. At 45K, then had left rear wheel bearing replaced. Lately, 55K miles the right rear was replaced again. Car makes me nervous to drive. Subaru says it is not a common problem. Mfg defect?

Think I will go back to buying a Honda, next car.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? No

Review Date: 14th July, 2008

1998 Subaru Forester Turbo 2.0 petrol from Japan

Year of manufacture1998
First year of ownership2008
Most recent year of ownership2008
Engine and transmission 2.0 petrol Automatic
Performance marks 8 / 10
Reliability marks 6 / 10
Comfort marks 8 / 10
Running Costs (higher is cheaper) 5 / 10
Overall marks (average of all marks)
6.8 / 10
Distance when acquired38000 kilometres
Most recent distance40000 kilometres
Previous carSubaru Forester

Summary:

Good on snow, but don't fall in love with it

Faults:

Nothing, yet.

General Comments:

Picked up another Forester at auction here in Japan, as I needed some wheels after getting in from Malaysia.

My previous Forester was making some expensive noises from the rear at 100,000km. Possibly differential and/or rear bearing/s.

The latest one has 38,000km, and in Japan you can pretty much bet the farm that this is genuine.

The Japanese economic climate means that at 100,000km on a Forester you either have to bite the bullet and shell out for expensive repairs and servicing, or replace and ship to another country, i.e. UK. Specifically, it's timing belt replacement time, which means the oil pump needs checking. And the Web is littered with anecdotal accounts of rear bearings giving up the ghost. I had taken to running in front-wheel-drive rather than four-wheel-drive. Partly to reduce the likelihood of the rear seizing up, and partly to improve fuel efficiency. Feels like taking two big dogs for a walk with them pulling in opposite directions. You switch by inserting a fuse in the fuse box under the bonnet (check the manual, you can figure it even if it is in Japanese).

Naturally the Trade in Japan is aware of the Forester's shortcomings, so it is discounted into the ground. And if you pick an unpopular colour like green, even more so. The Legacy Outback and Grand Wagon are an even bigger bargain, but I'm still wary of that 2.5-engine as changing head gaskets is not exactly my hobby.

And out here in the Japan Alps you do need the traction and ground clearance. Because once the snow is high enough to lift the car, you are quite literally screwed (technical term). Also, at this time of year with the frost coming out of the ground, what looks like firm ground quickly becomes a mud bath.

So within these parameters (buy at under 50,000km, dump at 100,000km), aim to be essentially the last owner. Particularly if it’s been thoroughly “wifed”, i.e. damaged on all four corners.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 17th March, 2008

10th Apr 2011, 23:48

Every Forester I buy is with bad head gaskets, and right at 170k miles. They all seem to fail at 170.

First time the H-G job is hard... but it's a snap after that. Rear wheel bearings can be pulled from a Legacy for 10 dollars. No big deal.

These Foresters are just another run of the mill but reliable car UNTIL it snows. I'm in California, and we just got 620 inches of snow for the 2010-2011 season. WITHOUT CHAINS I have driven all season without getting stuck once... pretty close a few times, but when there is 2-4 ft laid down at each storm, I'm not complaining. I keep a big strong tow rope to pull the $WD Suburbans and Expeditions out of icy patches.

Good, solid, reliable, cheap to fix, and best of all.. when a repair is done... the darned thing stays fixed.

Best of all the Legacy-Outbacks are now American made with American parts. Beats every 4WD and AWD car for low cost, never-get stuck driving.

I like my old LS400 for summer driving, but you'll never find me driving in the snow without a Forester or Legacy. Friends keep talking me into selling whatever Subaru I am driving at the time. What the heck: it's no big deal to fix them up, even when there is a bad head gasket. Quick, straightforward, and they stay fixed.

24th Feb 2013, 21:42

Amazing - what a difference a different culture and country - and a bit of luck - can make! My 2.0 L manual Forester has 293,000 km and appears to be going strongly. It has a new bit of exhaust and will be getting a bit of front end work soon. I have had it for over 2 years, and it has been splendidly reliable. I love the fact that it is a total road car with the additional benefit of medium off-road abilities. It will climb a 28 degree gradient or so, negotiate some pretty rough places, and is good on soft beach sand and mud.

I love it and want to keep it forever. I like a 4x4 I can throw around bitumen corners without worry.

10th Apr 2013, 00:06

Thanks for excellent info and advice.

Average review marks: 6.0 / 10, based on 27 reviews