1978 Toyota Pickup from North America - Comments

13th Nov 2007, 14:39

Kind of interesting to read these comments about bare-bones basic Toyotas. Mine's newer- a lot newer. It is a bare-bones Tacoma with the basic inline 4 cylinder engine, crank down windows, manual 5 speed, brown paint, brown interior, and two speakers. It didn't even come with a tape or CD player. Just a radio.

Anyhow, I've poured 220,000 miles on this truck so far and it doesn't seem to really affect it that much. Just get in and go. That's all. I thought about trading it in, but I figured as many miles are on it, I'll just keep right on driving it, which at the rate it seems to lack any signs of wear could be another 10 years.

Great little trucks.

15th Nov 2007, 14:17

I've owned several of the '75 to'78 Toyota trucks. Currently I have two, a '75 that I bought from the second owner with 202,000 on the clock and a 78 longbed, both the same color of Yellow! The '75 now has just under 350,000 on it, but it's been through some replacement parts. Currently, I'm converting it to 4 wheel drive.

I've owned the '75 for over 20 years, and it's been the best vehicle I've ever owned. The child I drove home from the hospital as a baby now want to drive it as soon as I'm done.

4th Sep 2008, 17:57

I too had a 1978 Toyota Camper. Awesome vehicle. Bought it on an island in Mexico and drove it all over Mexico and the northern part of Central America before taking it back to Oregon. The next winter we drove it from there to the most southern point on this continent you can drive to in the Darien jungles of Panama. Due to gas and time I had to sell it there but ended up getting $500 more than I paid for it (after repairs it about evened out). It was the perfect vehicle to that kind of trip. Simple enough that any repairs can reasonably be done on the road. And even though the 4 cylinders are pulling a LOT of weight, the power and mileage were reasonable. I brought along a good tow strap in case I ever got stuck, but only ended up using it to pull locals out of the sand at the beach! I miss my "Cabrona". My next vehicle will almost definitely be an older Toyota.

9th Feb 2010, 23:41

I bought a 78 Toyota pick up from Washington State. It runs great. Seems everything is functioning fine. I love it. When registered in California, a smog check is required. The car failed due to some of exceed level of CO2. Please help to let me know what part (or where) I can buy. Thanks in advance. Email mrdaveduc@yahoo.com

25th Mar 2010, 22:27

I own a 78 Toyota Pickup, and am a 3rd generation owner. This was my everyday transportation until I got my car. It is now my work truck.

This truck has never had an easy day in its life. Typical load is usually 700-1000 pounds. I have never seen a truck that did not wear out before the bed. The bed is the only major part replaced. Original engine, transmission, differential.

The truck has 450,000 recorded miles (speedometer cable unhooked for a number of years to prolong warranty). Engine has had only new rings and bearings and parts are cheap. Currently uses no oil (new rings). You will never find a tougher truck.

5th Mar 2011, 21:14

I am writing a bit premature, as I just today bought a 20r 5 speed long bed 1978 Toyota pickup for 300 dollars, My backyard mechanic friend, is extremely envious, he said.

The clutch has to be pumped, and the body is rusted, as I can see the pavement below my feet. The radio does not work. All is acceptable, and stress free.

I thank you all for the wonderful comments, they are supportive. I feel a bond that is growing every hour, for sure.

Any input from the 1978 Toyota long bed family, is accepted and hoped for.

Scott at dr10@q.com

30th Jun 2012, 17:57

How did you add a leaf to the suspension??

6th Sep 2013, 09:17

I just got a running 77 Toyota LB SR-5 for 400 bucks. The guy I bought it from is a local scrapper-scuffler dude who specializes in cannibalizing vehicles... It will have some surprises, of course, but most importantly, my teenage son and his friends think it's a really cool truck, so he will inherit it and hopefully turn it into a mode of self-employment, as well as recreation naturally...

Add another comment

Note: A Comments RSS Feed is available. New comments appear in the Members Area before the main site