1988 Nissan Sentra 4 cylinder from North America

Summary:

Economical

Faults:

Had the radiator hoses replaced, all 4 struts replaced, and has a slight oil leak. New paint job only because of fading.

General Comments:

It is a pretty good and economical car. Gets good miles around town. It's in excellent shape for 12 years old. It looks nice with a new paint job.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 9th August, 2000

1988 Nissan Sentra E 1.6 gas from North America

Faults:

-Fuel injector replaced (twice)

-Myriad electrical problems

-Struts replaced

-Door hinge bushings replaced

-Bad engine-body ground

-Numerous bumps and rattles

-Poor quality upholstery

-CV joints failed

-Clutch failed

General Comments:

Was a fairly expensive car to keep after 75,000 miles even with religious maintenance. I sold it at 96,000 having spent one too many days fixing the little things slowly falling apart. Would have a hard time buying another Nissan after this experience.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Don't Know

Review Date: 10th December, 1999

27th Aug 2011, 12:49

I have a 1988 Nissan Sentra, and have taken it to 3 mechanics for the limp mode syndrome.

The computer goes into the safe mode, and thus the fuel is limited when needed. The car will not go past 45 mph in 4th gear, but we do know for a fact that it is starving for fuel.

All vacuum hoses have been replaced, fuel filter and fuel pump in the tank, the throttle body injector with a new one, and the oxygen sensor. The car will pass emission testing. Yet it bucks and jumps.

I must shift from 1st to 2nd gear at 5 mph, and then at 15 mph for 3rd, and at 35 mph for 4th gear, then keep it under 45 mph or else it bucks and jumps, and will not go past 45 mph.

I hope that someone else has had success in solving this issue, because I am tapped out on ideas and money.

The next trial is the mass flow meter MAP sensor or the ECU.

Any help with this issue would be great.

6th Jul 2014, 03:30

Had the same problem. It was the mass air flow sensor.