1990 Pontiac Grand Prix SE 3.1 V6 from North America


A Money Pit In The High Miles


Replaced brake pads on this car more often than any other car I have owned, beginning at 20,000 miles.

Noticeable paint chipping at 30,000 miles (especially off of trim).

Power steering pump failed at 50,000 miles during a trip from Connecticut to Chicago.

Driver's side electric window would not open or close on occasion.

Went through 5 alternators on this car.

Right rear strut froze at 80,000 miles.

Replaced transmission at 175,000 miles.

Front driver's seat broke loose from one of its mounts at 180,000 miles (had to be welded).

Fuel pump failed at 199,000.

General Comments:

The 3.1 engine itself is a workhorse and has never burned oil or required any major repair.

Car handled well in its 'youth' - nice torque for a 6 as well.

Brake system was inadequate for this size car.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? No

Review Date: 18th December, 2002

10th Sep 2004, 12:10

I have the same problems with my Grand Prix LE. The brakes, overheating, runs rough, and overheating are my major problems. She still peals out though!

4th Feb 2005, 12:37

I bought a 1990 Grand Prix in 2002 had 220,000 miles for $300.00. Still running today, no problems. Never replaced anything except the plugs and brakes. Now I have 315,000 miles and still running well. Just wanted Pontiac to know that they did a good job.

12th Oct 2010, 13:26

I have a turbo Grand Prix. My power steering line blew as well. I also have over heating problems and battery relay problems.

1990 Pontiac Grand Prix LE 3.1 from North America


Great great car good first


There was a problem with the fuel pump going out a lot, but I bought the cheap parts so you get what you pay for. the gages on the dash are off the gas gage doesn't read right. no really big problems. just got to keep them well maintained and it well run for a long time.

General Comments:

The seats are comfortable I know I got kicked out of my house and had to sleep in the car. The performance (acceleration) is great for a 6 cylinder I raced a bunch a cars and won. this is a great car it runs great. it's been in my family since 1991 and we had minimal problems. I hit a deer with it at 40 mph and had no damage to the car witch I thought was great.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 15th November, 2002

1990 Pontiac Grand Prix LE 3.1 from North America


I will never buy any g.m. car again


After the warranty expired I started to experience problems with the instrument cluster, the fuel system and the power steering. I also had to replace numerous computer sensors as well as the computer and the chip inside the computer.

General Comments:

The car stopped running at 47 k miles. I replaced 5 fuel injectors, then I had to replace the crank sensor, the fuel pump 3 times within a year, the throttle position sensor, the manifold air pressure sensor, the crank position sensor, the fuel pump relay, the computer and the chip inside the computer, the coil packs and the ignition module this within a period of about 1000 miles.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? No

Review Date: 11th November, 2002

17th Apr 2004, 02:15

There is ABSOLUTELY no way for all those sensors to go that fast. A failed sensor is not that common. You had a computer/electrical problem from the get go and wasted A LOT of money replacing sensors that were good to begin with, are you still mad at the car?

25th Apr 2005, 00:24

I do believe that if you had a mechanic replace ALL of those parts you were definitely hosed big time. He was just guessing at what was wrong and didn't even replace them correctly. If you replaced all of these things on your own, you would do well to learn a little more about cars. In any case, there is no way all those things could have gone wrong without some serious incompetence on the part of the "parts swapper".

13th Mar 2010, 09:44

Connectors to the ECM are usually to blame for the problems listed. Unfortunately you were not taking it to a qualified technician.