15th Apr 2007, 09:07

Give me a break. You think the domestic trucks have been flawless for the past century? Have you read ALL the domestic truck reviews on this site? They are littered with subjects like "Never again" and "My biggest mistake".

You think Harley Davidson made perfect motorcycles their entire existence?

I've known lots of people that have had endless problems with these "icons" of the American road, so this xenophobic truck crap is just dismissing the reality.

15th Apr 2007, 15:52

17:22 Yeah, sure, like Toyota's have a history of breaking down and Ford's don't. You have that one completely backwards. Even if Ford made better trucks than Toyota, and they don't of course, I wouldn't buy one because I don't believe that they're going to be around in 5 years. How many years can you sustain multi-BILLION dollar losses and still survive. If they did make a good product, like Toyota does, they wouldn't be having trouble selling them. It doesn't matter how many they've sold in the past, they're obviously on their way out, thanks to their own mistakes.

15th Apr 2007, 18:00

02:37 I said my personal truck is a Tacoma, but anyway, I do use it for work, as an HVAC contractor in my spare time. I can load it down with a furnace, air conditioner, and all the necessary material as well as pulling a small trailer behind it to haul away whatever I've removed from the jobsite. It never breaks down, gets about 18 mpg fully loaded and pulling a trailer, and does as well as 22 mpg with a tune-up, a K@N air filter, and a conservative right foot.

Even with a full size truck, I couldn't get everything in the bed, and I wouldn't get anywhere near the gas mileage I get with the Tacoma. This truck is rated for 17/19 mpg, but as with any Toyota I've ever owned, it does better than EPA estimates, and I never put anything other than 87 octane in it. Not to mention it's fun as hell to drive as a weekender off-road truck, nothing else comes close. Wouldn't trade it for any other truck made today.

21st Apr 2007, 20:47

15:52 obviously doesn't own a Ford, has probably never even SAT in a Ford, and definitely has NO BASIS for saying they "break down".

My family's 3 companies use Ford vans and Rangers. Some of these have been in the fleets since 1993. Going 300,000 miles+ with a Ford with only routine maintenance is common.

Also, to maintain that Fords break down and Toyotas don't is incorrect, in view of the fact that ALMOST TWICE as many negative reviews for the much ballyhooed Camry are posted from 2002 to thru 2005 than for the much attacked Ford Taurus for that same period.

People making such false and unfounded statements, such as that Fords "break down" need to be aware that the myths they spread can mislead people into buying cars that let them down and cost them dearly. Before making rash statements, READ THE CAMRY REVIEWS!!

22nd Apr 2007, 04:16

I do not believe in overloading any small truck is safe or practical if you are in business. Its hazardous, compromising, and not worth the risk. You indicated that even a full size truck at times is not large enough. A loaded trailer also needs heavier brakes not small brakes quickly fading on the tow vehicle. I have seen people overloading hatchbacks and small trucks to the point of inviting an accident. I have gotten better mileage than you indicated with a full size V6 domestic pickup in lieu of straining its engine, frame, with added wear on suspension,springs etc and lacking larger brakes for stopping safely. Even if you only once in a while need more capacity it indicates your truck is too small and not jeopardizing yourself and the rest of us on the roadways.

22nd Apr 2007, 11:15

<<15:52 obviously doesn't own a Ford, has probably never even SAT in a Ford, and definitely has NO BASIS for saying they "break down".>>

I guess that's true if you never read any long term road tests, never pick up a Consumer Reports, never know anyone who has suffered with a Ford (as friends have).

22nd Apr 2007, 11:20

"15:52 obviously doesn't own a Ford, has probably never even SAT in a Ford, and definitely has NO BASIS for saying they "break down"."

Explain this site then:

http://blog.cash4usedcars.com/used-cars-to-avoid-like-they-are-on-fire/

Yeah, it's a blog, but you're going to have to provide proof to refute what is being presented.

13th Aug 2007, 09:37

Do you even know what blogs are for? They are personal sites that people with their own agenda-driven view use as a way to put out their message. The person who made that blog doesn't like American vehicles.

You people really need to learn how to think for yourselves. I have enough brains to not listen to Car and Driver, Motor Trend, CNN, Edmunds, MSNBC, or anyone else. I don't need them telling me what the best truck is. They will use their own personal bias as any human being does. I take it as a grain of salt that Car and Driver and MotorTrend like the new Silverado. I don't listen to them whether they favor Toyota, Ford, Chevy, or anyone else. I can get down on my knees and look under the truck and see which one has the most guts.

As for the blog, why didn't they report the sludge problems and recalls Toyota has been having? The media is liberal, they don't like American products, and I'm pretty sure they don't care much for America either. As soon as Ford has a recall on something as little as a seat cover, it's all over the news; but when Toyota has a recall no matter whether it's major or not, you don't hear a peep out of anyone. The media has the power to control what the people hear. They'll tell the story how they WANT you to hear it. They don't like Ford or GM so they'll be sure to pronounce any recalls or sales losses they're having. They like Toyota, so they'll never tell you any recalls or problems they're having.

This will give the public the impression that these foreign vehicles are perfect, and those horrible domestics are not. Does anyone even know that GM and Ford are now turning themselves around and making profits again? Of course not, that'll never make front page news, as their layoffs did. If Toyota's are so great, then you people should be able to tell of personal experiences that will impress the rest of us. Quit quoting magazines.

Has anyone seen the September edition of Car and Driver? It has 15 Chevy ads in it, and big surprise, they like Chevy's now. Before, they had 15 Toyota ads in them, and they liked Toyota better. All those people are about is making money. Read their magazines if they entertain you, but don't go by what they say.

I have personal experience as far as endurance goes to tell me how good 30 year old Chevy's are and 10 year old Ford are. I don't need a magazine telling me how many miles are on my Ford, and I don't need a magazine to tell me how old my Chevy is.

If your Toyota is so tough, then tell us something impressive that you've done with it, besides playing in mud. Has anyone out there ever hauled a two ton payload with a Toyota? Has anyone out there ever pulled six tons with a Toyota? If so, please tell us about the story, so we can at least believe you.

My family has had these experiences with Chevy's and Ford's, now it's your turn to tell us. Also, saying "Ford's are junk" a thousand times doesn't make a Toyota any better. Make an actual argument instead of name-calling.

17th Jan 2009, 20:46

I've pulled a 31' Airstream travel trailer with mine, and my dad carries about a ton in the back of his routinely. He also pulls a trailer that is sometimes 10,000 lbs on the farm... carefully. HOWEVER I don't want anyone to think that the Tundra is more than a half-ton truck. It isn't designed to tow 12,000 lbs, and neither were the contemporary 1/2 ton domestics. It wasn't designed to haul 4000lbs nor were the contemporary 1/2 ton domestics. If you want a heavier duty truck than the Toyota was designed to be, buy one. But commentary should only involve 1/2 ton trucks of the same manufacturing timeframe. There were domestic half tons at this time that were rated to haul and tow more than the Tundra --- THEY are TRUE competitors. But if someone wanted a truck for its reliability and off-road prowess more than heavy load pulling or hauling, the Toyota has a reputation for both. I sold my Tundra 5 months ago but for the miles I owned it, it was extremely reliable. So no complaints. But once again ---- This is no Top Kick or Mack.