1992 Ford Taurus SHO 3.0 Liter 24 valve from North America


A Street Fighter in Old Dockers and Topsiders


I just bought the car from the original owner. He kept extensive service records. CV joint and/or boot failures, air conditioner service, clutch replacement and speedometer failure include some of the issues that have been addressed.

General Comments:

I am including this information for people that are interested in Taurus SHO's and have actually considered buying one just to have something different from everyone else. I own a 1992 Gen 2 and a 1997 Gen 3.

The 1st and 2nd generation SHO's are entirely different animals than the 3rd generation SHO's. I just bought a 1992 SHO with a 5 speed manual (of course!) Do you REALLY want to sneak up on people? Do you have a "Clark Kent/Superman" thing going for you? Well then my friend, I have the perfect car for you! The preferred car would be the Gen 2 because the flywheel surface is larger. Larger surface means less likely to burn up and better power transfer from the engine to the transmission.

The 2nd generation SHO is this sort of mundane looking older four door car. There are available body mods and rims that make the cars look better. When driven in a civil manner it acts pretty much like any other Taurus I imagine. THEN YOU LAY INTO THAT GAS WHEN SOME CLOWN CUTS YOU OFF!!! Oh, people GET the idea QUICKLY! This car has a 7000 rpm redline downshifting from 5th to 3rd is not an issue! Say goodbye to that inconsiderate cellphone blabbing fool and say hello to 110 miles an hour :D!!!

Now lets talk about shifting, between 1989 and 1992 ALL SHO's are 5 speed manuals. So if you can't actually drive (driving automatics is not driving) it's your lucky day. For those without the coordination or inspiration to learn to drive a manual transmission you can look to the 1993 to 1995 SHO's. If you really want one (a SHO), Most of the SHO's for sale fall under this description (automatics YUCK). You will pry the manual transmission SHO's from their owners dead, cold hands including MINE.

Now comparing Gen 1's and Gen 2's to the Gen 3's. The Gen 1's and Gen 2's are "Angry Street Brawlers" and the Gen 3's are a "Civilized Interstate Express". Gen 1's and Gen 2's can be coaxed into action ANYWHERE/ANYTIME. Gen 3's make it happen out on the freeway when you turn the Overdrive off. Just let the tranny settle and bury the accelerator into the floor board. The Gen 3 doesn't really "accelerate" so much as it ascends. The Gen 1/Gen 2 cars make an angry noise in this same situation. The Gen 3 when pressed makes high tech sounds.

The Gen 3's in stock form handle noticeably better than the Gen 2's. That makes sense because the Gen 3 suspension was tuned by Jackie Stewart.

If you want a civilized, refined high speed cruiser for a lot less money than the Japenese Infiniti's, Maximas etc etc, get a Generation 3 Taurus. Just be prepared to shell out an extra five or six hundred dollars to get the cams welded or buy one that has already been modified. If you don't YOU'LL BE SORRY!!! Ford and Yamaha dropped the ball on the cam design for the Gen 3 V8.

If you want a car that will sneak up on those corny rice cookers that have modifications limited to an exhaust system and a wing get the Gen 2! When they were first released it beat the Mustang GT in stock form. The engines were built by Yamaha (the motorcycle company)

Have fun and be prepared to spend BIG MONEY getting it run just right. After that you will be happy!

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 29th August, 2006

30th Aug 2006, 19:52

Keep driving like an ass at 110 mph and they'll be prying your cold dead fingers from your Taurus soon enough!

10th May 2008, 22:41

This is a great review of the SHO. The reviewer has explained just about everything I feel about my 5spd 1991 Taurus SHO. They are great cars!!

25th Jun 2008, 11:59

MY '92 SHO has 289,000 miles and runs like the day I drove it off the showroom floor at Magic City Ford in Charlotte. I've been through some starters, clutch assemblies, and some of the other routine stuff. I've got some tranny noise that's telling me it's time for a re-build. Anybody got a '92 5-speed they'd like to sell?

Pete McKnight

Blue Ridge VA


4th Jun 2009, 14:28

I had a 93 automatic I enjoyed it as an auto but would have rather had a manual. I hope if they survive the difficult economy, they will take a risk on cars like this in the future.

10th Jun 2010, 17:54

I owned this car from new for 10 years. Not mentioned in the review is that this car has one big weakness: crappy brakes! The OEM brakes are too small and the discs are made of cheap metal that warps. Replacing the discs with higher-quality aftermarket parts solved the warping problem; but fitting bigger discs requires a more expensive spindle replacement. There are some cheap, easy performance mods that make a difference: a new crossover pipe and cat-back exhaust system; bigger throttle body and cold air induction.

If you want serious performance improvement, you have to do things to stiffen the body structure of the car, for both front and rear suspension.

All-in-all, for what it was, it was a fun car. Not a BMW, but a fun car... and a great Q-ship.

18th Oct 2014, 09:42

8 years later... I still own my 1992, my 1997 SHO, a '95 Probe GT and '98 Dakota 2wd with 318 V8, with the '97 SHO being the lone automatic in the bunch. Buying new cars is for the rich and those that don't mind being broke.

My '92 SHO can still be relied upon to get 21.5 MPG on freeway and rev up on demand.

Life is good when you know how to turn a wrench.

19th Oct 2014, 11:50

I like having at least one new car to travel anywhere and long distances. I like working on old cars near home, not out on a dark desolated back road. And I'm not rich or broke.

1992 Ford Taurus GL 3.0 V6 from North America


Reliable and gorgeous


Starter solenoid went out at 71,000.

General Comments:

I love my Taurus. I bought it for 800 dollars. Nothing was wrong with it, and there still is not.

The only problem I've had in the three years I've owned it, was my solenoid on the starter, which was about 40 dollars. I fixed it myself, and I am definitely not a mechanic.

I would recommend this car to anyone. They are not pricey at all, but they are extremely reliable. Plus they are very good looking. Think about how many you see everyday on the roads... you know they are reliable. Do not kid yourself.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 24th July, 2006

25th Jul 2006, 15:15

We had 175,000 miles on our '92 before being totalled in a rear-end collision, and it still ran and drove without a hitch, even after 175k and being declared a total loss! So plan on yours being around for awhile and know that you got yourself a damn good car. (The 3.0 is a reliable engine, but stay away from the 3.8 Taurus, nothing, but trouble..)