2000 Honda Accord EX 2.3 from North America

Summary:

Never again

Faults:

The most recent problem was the engine. Changed the head gasket at 99,000 miles, and it still leaks. Honda dealer is saying that it is a manufacturing defect, but won't replace the engine. At about 90,000 miles, noticed that the oil level was low, and ever since it takes 2 quarts of oil for every 600-700 miles without any leaks under the car.

Several minor issues, but I am most likely will never own another Honda.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? No

Review Date: 6th June, 2011

6th Jun 2011, 12:24

We went the Honda route also. Never again for us as well. Ours was using a quart of oil every 1000 miles at less than 50,000 miles. The CV joints were hammering like crazy at just over 40,000 miles. It was very poorly made with fragile parts, and used plastic where American cars use metal. It ate brake pads like candy, and like yours, was ready for the junk yard at less than 100,000 miles.

We've learned our lesson. No more cheaply made Japanese cars... EVER. Our current GM just turned 100,000 and has not had one single repair in the 8 years we've owned it. Years of ad hype have created the myth that Japanese cars are better, but it is a well-paid-for myth. Even J.D. Powers' owner surveys now rank an American car maker (Ford) as the world's best car.

2000 Honda Accord Euro R 2.2 DOHC Vtec from Australia and New Zealand

Summary:

Wolf in sheep's clothing

Faults:

The gearbox is slowly failing; a common problem on most CL1 Accords. Luckily, the warranty is there to cover it. If you do get an Accord, check to see if the gearbox has been re-built. If not, put aside over a grand to get it re-built.

General Comments:

Firstly, this isn't any ordinary Accord.

It comes equipped with Honda's most powerful H22A engine, producing 220hp @ 7200rpm and a respectable torque figure of 220nm @ 6700rpm. This is usually the catch with other small capacity Honda engines; although it is easy to bump up the HP, it's is pretty hard to do the same with the torque figure. Given that fact, although on paper it is quite impressive, you have to really work the car in order to realise its power. That's okay though, because in buying this car, you're probably not the type to cruise around at 1500rpm to save gas. Speaking of which, with a high compression ratio, you need to pump the high octane stuff. Party trick for the Euro R would be the LSD to help plant its power to the ground.

My Honda Accord Euro R is bone stock standard. No modifications have been done to it whatsoever. The Accord is equipped with 16 inch alloy wheels, a stiffer body and improved brakes. Also comes with Recaro Bucket seats, a leather wrapped MOMO steering wheel, and aluminium shift knob, white gauge cluster, and a red painted engine cover. Also, this car was one of the first Japanese cars to come out with HID headlights, and the usual creature comforts are also standard; power windows, air con, driver and passenger airbags, ABS.

This car has 2 personalities. You can drive it around town, and it is a very comfortable ride, and yet no one would know you have 220hp beating under the bonnet. The other personality would be when you enter VTEC zone, kicking in at around 5400rpm, the car is a monster pulling towards redline in every gear, screaming its head off,

Throwing this car around corners, it handles like a dream. The suspension is hard enough to take on twisty tight turns, yet gentle enough for easy driving. Putting this thing through its paces on the twisty back roads is a wonderful experience. Keep it in VTEC, and you're in for a treat.

So if you're looking for a car that won't attract the boys in blue, is cheap on insurance, cheap on gas (if you stay out of VTEC), and able to rip up the tarmac, the Accord Euro is definitely one not to be overlooked.

Would you buy another car from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 2nd March, 2011